Audio Visual Sketch Series | Summer 2021

Plasticine layering

Multi-coloured layering and compositing

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Barbie doll

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Dirty Talk

Short Film | 4mins | May 2020

The afternoon motion sickness.
Look outside, it helps. 

LEGAULT. ARUDA. 2 UNREAD MESSAGES.

The sun is warm
but no one waits for a haircut outside the barbershop.

TRUDEAU. TAM. RESCUED DOGS ON DODO.

The breeze is light
but no one is running towards the metro.

TRUMP. FAUCI. PIZZA FILTER ON MESSENGER CHAT.

The quivering ribbon in the tree
is still out of reach.

*ding*

 3 UNREAD MESSAGES. MARU THE CAT SITS IN A BOX.

Pay attention Gabriela.

“A short film project challenges artists to find ‘inspiration and enlightenment’ in the experience of sheltering in place. And it’s working.” [1]Norman Wilner, “Canadian directors are making films in self-isolation”, Now Toronto, May 12, 2020, https://nowtoronto.com/movies/canadian-directors-making-films-in-self-isolation, accessed on … Continue reading

But the film I was making, Dirty Talk, was not going to be inspiring. When I was asked to make a film for the Greetings from Isolation Project, I wasn’t sure if I had the energy, but I had nothing to lose. Dirty Talk is a time capsule of my state of mind during the first wave. It captures the yearning and the revulsion I felt as a single person living alone. Spit bubbles, licking doorknobs and washing hands in saliva in close up against a black background while I channelled my inner ASMR host to create something erotic and uncanny, intimate and anonymous.  Dirty Talk is my most grotesque film, a PG film that plays porn film festivals.

Last year I researched the aesthetic principle of the grotesque which is best understood in terms of what it does, as a verb, rather than as something with a fixed set of qualities, a noun. [2] Frances S. Connelly, “Introduction: Entering the Spielraum”, The Grotesque in Western Art and Culture, Cambridge University Press, New York, 2012 The grotesque creates gaps, spaces of play in between culturally relative boundaries; it generates an uncomfortable oscillation between attraction and repulsion. What is grotesque yesterday is mundane today as we create new boundaries in new places. The experience of the film changes with every phase of this pandemic. Although we hope for a return, I doubt the liquid floor feeling  will stop.

References

References
1 Norman Wilner, “Canadian directors are making films in self-isolation”, Now Toronto, May 12, 2020, https://nowtoronto.com/movies/canadian-directors-making-films-in-self-isolation, accessed on March 29, 2021
2 Frances S. Connelly, “Introduction: Entering the Spielraum”, The Grotesque in Western Art and Culture, Cambridge University Press, New York, 2012

Video Sketch Series | Spring 2020

Santa fills our Christmas stocking with small toys for young children to play with while the parents wake up. I am too old for this, even the youngest of four is an adult, rolling out midday while the parents get up at six. The novelty melting snowman is all about the white plastic texture that gravity pulls back to a puddle. It’s fluid that moves slowly enough so that we can observe it’s transformation from solid to liquid. What a convenient lack of colour for someone who mainly uses the luma key tool to composite different shapes. What can this blob do?

Novelty melting snowman a.k.a. the blob

#0 Ode to Mike

Mike remarks that I should make an animation of him as he hands me a guest pass. I accept the challenge, though I doubt he’s seen any of my recent work. Mike’s photo does not blend into the melting blobs filmed from the side on top of a mirror. My appetite for the blob is wet.

Sorry Mike

#1 Flower Blob

The blob could be part of Crreeeeps. I want pretty flowers to counterbalance irritating sounds. I reserve my favourite black room in the Visual Art’s building to play with the new cameras the film department bought and the blob. I spin some plastic flowers in a water filled cylindrical vase. The fluid on fluid meshes better than Mike.

It’s not 3D?

Simone at the backyard critique assumes the image is computer generated.

#2 Viral Blob

The blob sits on a mirror that I spin around by hand. The jerk of my hand-held movement over shadows the melting of the blob when it’s sped up. I superimpose layers of this image atop itself. Would it have looked like a virus in 2019?

#3 River and Red Skin Blob

The St-Lawrence river in spring from Cartier Bridge, the blob and a close-up of red paint cracking on my skin are of different space scales, time scales and textures that I superimpose. I’d like to push these extremes of scale further away from each other. What other ways can I mix the blob to the body?

My initial instinct to film the blob from the side and reflect it is the most satisfying, without Mike’s beautiful smirk. I am concerned with the perception of the blob as 3D animation. I’m not sure what I’m looking for here and I’m not sure what I’ve found.

Crreeeeps

Sound Loop | 10mins | Dec 2019

– So, apparently I’m a video artist now.
– Are you sure they weren’t just throwing you shade?

Says Ron as we wait in line for our next Fantasia Film Festival film.

I know where Ron is coming from. We breathe sci-fi, horror and fantasy films with kids in metal shirts who cheer on Korean noodle commercials and make cat sounds mixed in with the occasional hiss of beer cans opening as the theatre goes dark. [1] Parallel madness, Fantasia 2017: It’s Alive! Cinema’s Alive!,  September 30 2017, https://parallelmadness.com/presents/fantasia-2017-its-alive-cinemas-alive,  accessed on May 12 2021 I also know where Dominic, the professor who told me this, is coming from: I remind him of his friend Anna Hawkins. I don’t fill the screen with one image, I cut it up into parts. Photography is to Cinema, what illustration is to animation, but then what of collage, when it is not an animation collage, such as Terry Gilliam popularized in Monty Python, nor a collage film in the method of Arthur Lipset?

If I’m making video art, then it must play in an art gallery to meandering viewers that arrive anytime and leave when bored. Liv told me she didn’t mind seeing the beginning of a film after it had already ended. But I did. It’s easier to create a rhythm from the sound and adapt my images to that rhythm than vice-versa. Crreeeeps (that’s two r’s and four e’s) is the looped soundtrack for a looped film I haven’t made yet. I was interrupted by the plague. One moment it is a calming screensaver and the next time it is nails on chalkboard. There is no dominant emotional state, akin to  a moody teenager. The organic is blended to the digital and the figurative to the abstract in reflection of my visual experiments (see Pond and Antidote). Electronic sounds, a cello, an electric guitar and recordings from a Japanese temple are mixed to blur the line between soundscape and music. Walter Murch talks about a similar blending in Apocalypse Now Lung Do Bridge scene where the sounds melt between the bridge repair, the chaos of the gun fight, the jungle and rock music of unknown origins [2] Murch, Walter, “Touch of Silence”, Lecture, Institut Francais, London, Friday 17 April 1998, in Soundscape, eds Sider, Larry; Freeman, Diane; Sider, Jerry, London, Wallflower Press, 2003.  
The one time I run into some long-haired and tattooed programmers from Fantasia at an art show, I was leaving the David Altmedj show mentioned in Audiovisual Sketch Series | Winter 2019. I prepared them for the zebras shitting teethed rainbow fruit in a time loop inside. They loved it. Maybe the division between these cultures of art and genre film is not as much in the medium as in the aesthetics. They needed a touch of rage and disgust. Could I ever get a crowd to miaow in an art gallery?

References

References
1 Parallel madness, Fantasia 2017: It’s Alive! Cinema’s Alive!,  September 30 2017, https://parallelmadness.com/presents/fantasia-2017-its-alive-cinemas-alive,  accessed on May 12 2021
2 Murch, Walter, “Touch of Silence”, Lecture, Institut Francais, London, Friday 17 April 1998, in Soundscape, eds Sider, Larry; Freeman, Diane; Sider, Jerry, London, Wallflower Press, 2003.

Audiovisual Sketch Series | Winter 2019

Hi Gabriela! This is really, really cool, made my day! Very flattered that any of my work would be inspiration for something like this. Thanks for passing it along!

Michael DeForge wrote me an email in reaction to my film, Deer DeForge (below right) bMichael DeForge wrote me an email in reaction to my film, Deer DeForge (below right) based on one of his illustrations (below left). [1] Michael Deforge, Very Casual, Toronto: Koyama Press, 2013.

My practice has not drifted too far from my childhood hobby of creating highly decorated fan mail to send to my favourite bands. There was something about transforming the aesthetic and music of artists I admired into new work that made me feel connected to a greater force. How the intangible parts of an artwork become animate in the process of transforming into a new artwork drives my practice, as if that piece is dying when no one makes new art from it. Though I am a filmmaker, I am as influenced by mycelium networks or a box of Fruit Loops as by film. I relish in stealing from and rearranging the culture that surrounds me.

Finished’ implies the termination of development, death. I like ‘ready to be shown’ because it suggests that the sculpture could keep on growing (even if it doesn’t), and therefore respects it as a living thing.

David Altmedj [2]David Altmedj, interviewed by Robyn Jeffrey, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, January 5, 2015,  https://www.gallery.ca/magazine/artists/an-interview-with-david-altmejd, accessed on April … Continue reading

I wait for it to move, but David Altmejd’s statue The Pit is still (above left). [3]David Altmedj, The Pit, 2011, polystyrene, expandable foam, wood, epoxy clay, epoxy gel, sand, synthetic hair, resin, acrylic paint, latex paint, glass eye, Musée d’Art Comtemporain de Montréal, … Continue reading Something about the repetition of limbs, implied liquid or malleable textures, the fragmented bodies implies movement. Rather than wait for the sculptor, I will animate it myself. Translating The Pit from sculpture into film was going to be my main thesis, until I noticed the pattern of this process in my work, such as with Deer DeForge and a pattern between the types of cultural products that entice me like, like with Espace Go’s 2013–2014 season posters (above right) [4] Marc-André Rioux, Isabelle Allard et al, Théâtre Espace Go — Saison 2013–2014, Ad campaign, Montreal: Cosette, 2013.

One week is not the time frame I had in mind for such a project, but Mark’s sketch of a wooden frame with the camera attached to one end makes me think it’s possible. My seething in class earns me an extra week. Sunday morning, we go to Home Depot, build the frame and shoot. I was able to reserve the black gallery room to shoot on Monday. I bring fancy matcha cookies and croissants for my two assistants and models. Everyone else joins with beers following our afternoon class. Things get out of hand as we film mouths from up close. The following week I layer the ingredients, taste the results, rinse and repeat.

#1 Spaghetti Face

Can I recreate this sense of attraction? Big Kids by Michael Deforge (again) [5]Big Kids, Michael Deforge, Drawn & Quarterly, Montreal, 2014
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We dropped spaghetti onto a mask at the end of a long cubic frame with a camera at the other end. I switched the mask for a face and layers different shots of the spaghetti. As they hover over the face there is a tension and yearning. I would love to do this with a slow motion camera to lengthen the landing, though it’s unclear to me whether it’s the tension or the landing that is most important.

#2 Ghost Shirt

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A dissonance of movement between the strings of this old costume shirt and the dancing legs is emphasized by the digital glitches created in the compositing of the two. The effect is joyful and uncanny.

#3 Inside Out Face

I copy the effect of light in the mouth from Laurie Anderson’s O Superman video and play it against the eyes on black from an old project and the extreme close-up of taste buds on a tongue to create a face of sorts. I’m disappointed to discover that it reminds many of the Têtes a Claques, but I still don’t hate it.

#4 Bubble Face

Full boday intermediate
Head Intermediate

I imitate the Espace Go posters using the same oil and balsamic vinegar to create a mask, as I did in both Dinos are Not Dead and Deer DeForge.  I film my colleague’s faces moving at a designated angle every minute from three cameras to create an intermediate. The final result is closest to the inspiration image and the intermediates are a discovery in their own rights.

#5 Arms

I try to imitate the arm from David Altmejd’s The Pit. It turns into something else with it’s own appeal. It’s closer to Norman McClaren’s Pas de Deux, but the digital tools permit irregular time and size manipulations. Can I integrate this with other body elements? What’s missing?

Imitating the double arm in the top right corner from David Altmedj – The Pit
Norman McClaren – Pas de deux

#6 Fire Hands

I want a head for the floating eyes and teeth lights from #3 Inside Out Face. My hand jerks in and out of a black frame, then I layer the clip. Layered. It’s not a head, it’s better than that. When I layer this fire hand against itself and it turns into electricity.

Sound and Installation

Can I translate the images into sound the same way I translate still images into moving images?

When I present my work two weeks later, I hand over feedback sheets asking about the sounds they imagined to avoid obvious directions. The pieces are well received. I’m told they are beautiful, which rubs me wrong. I want the sound to emphasize the uncanny and discomfort. 

AM DeVito responds to my call for collaborators in the electroacoustics department with whom I learn, exchange and play. We record the sound of pasta, crunching celery onto which they sprinkle Ableton magic and bake it into #4 Bubble Face and #5 Arms.

I repeated my layering process from the #6 Fire hands, with varied sounds like frying bacon, hands rubbing, glass edge rubbing against guitar strings, biting into a pear. 

“So where do you plan on exhibiting these?” I didn’t. These were meant to be tests with many loose ends that bugged me. However they were well received. Not sure what to do with them, so l collected these three audiovisual sketches together and threw it on the internet.

Stratum | Three Audiovisual Sketches | 7 mins | Dec 2019

Many saw these as life sized or bigger than life installations, so I got special permission to borrow three projectors at once and play around with them to see what would happen.

The projections made it hard to walk around without covering the images. The size did not change my relationship to the image as I hoped it would. I became more aware of the gallery than the content of my projection. After a while, I questionned why I was here since it did not feel like play.

I hated it.

References

References
1 Michael Deforge, Very Casual, Toronto: Koyama Press, 2013.
2 David Altmedj, interviewed by Robyn Jeffrey, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, January 5, 2015, 
 https://www.gallery.ca/magazine/artists/an-interview-with-david-altmejd, accessed on April 26, 2021
3 David Altmedj, The Pit, 2011, polystyrene, expandable foam, wood, epoxy clay, epoxy gel, sand, synthetic hair, resin, acrylic paint, latex paint, glass eye, Musée d’Art Comtemporain de Montréal, Montreal, https://flux.macm.org/en/the-gallery/the-pit/, accessed on December 1, 2020.
4 Marc-André Rioux, Isabelle Allard et al, Théâtre Espace Go — Saison 2013–2014, Ad campaign, Montreal: Cosette, 2013.
5 Big Kids, Michael Deforge, Drawn & Quarterly, Montreal, 2014

Antidote

Music Video | 10 mins | Aug 2019

The tire was dangerously compressed. I guess I hadn’t thought this through. I was cycling home on the narrow and steep bike path of Pont Jacques-Cartier with a large stolen rock from Parc Jean-Drapeau in my bag. Was this too much weight for my bike? A week or two earlier, a couple of days before I was meant to VJ a musical performance for the first time, my computer screen went blue: Windows crashed. After testing the possibility of installation in a VA basement gallery with three projectors (see Audiovideo Sketch Series | Winter 2019—Installation), I was averse to projecting onto white walls. I wanted to incorporate images to natural environments (see Pond). I wanted to project onto the rock walls at Jean-Drapeau Parc during a separate musical performance for the rocks. However, the electrical plugs I had discovered, didn’t work, the projector’s battery was short-lived and the weather would need to comply with resource availability. That’s when I stole the rock.

You don’t have to make music videos before making real films anymore.

Explained the short film director (short both in duration of film and height of director) to me at a Benelux crowded with film geeks and filmmakers.

As a child it never occurs to you that there is such a thing as real films or fake films, or that Jonathan Glazer, Spike Lee and Michel Gondry were making music videos as a chore to get to other places. Though comments like this made it clear that music videos were second rate to many in cinema, but all my plans had fallen apart and I love making music videos.

In preparing for this VJ experiment, my Cecelia McKinnon aka Star Canyon, told me the song was about rocks and fracking. Rock, be it volcanic or sedimentary, is formed through a process of layering. To us, they hold on to the past in fossils and do not move, when in fact rock is in movement and transformation at a speed we humans cannot see. I borrowed her rock collection: some plain grey, some sparkled, some were wrapped in felt or seaweed. She does not remember why she picked up these rocks, or why they remain a treasure. I recorded them as I swung around a table lamp to let the light reveal them and digitally rotated and layered these images onto each other. I projected these images onto her face. I projected the images of the rocks and the rocks on the face, onto my stolen rock. With each layer captures the interaction of the body and the rock with the digital shifting of colour and pixelation caused by the projector and camera. 

I had wanted to work with this layering effect ever since I had seen Michael Reich’s absurd and crass feature film: She’s Allergic to Cats (2016) which blends 4K RED footage to low-fi camera. A classmate noted that the work seemed to belong in an art gallery. I realized that Antidote resembles more the work of Erin Schirreff’s Still (2019) which I saw at Parisian Laundry. I also had the pleasure to hear the artist talk at CICA. She is a sculptor who mainly works in film and photography. The viewer never gets to see the three-dimensional modern sculpted objects as he is interested in the transformation and the trace of the sculpted object into these new forms.

[…] her unique play of media between the moving image and single exposures have been dubbed ‘duration pieces,’ which add temporal motion to the otherwise still, and illusions of depth to two-dimensional surfaces. […] She’s been shooting it under different light conditions in her studio, and swinging us through their atmospheric and illusory effects. [1]Gooden, Sky, “How Artist Erin Shirreff Reveals the Secrets of Modernist Sculpture”, Frieze, February 22, 2019, … Continue reading

I guess it was just my luck that so many of my plans failed and I ended up doing something I enjoyed and made it home without a flat.

References

References
1 Gooden, Sky, “How Artist Erin Shirreff Reveals the Secrets of Modernist Sculpture”, Frieze, February 22, 2019, https://www.frieze.com/article/how-artist-erin-shirreff-reveals-secrets-modernist-sculpture, accessed on March 3rd

Pond

Video Installation | 10 mins | June 2019

You get on the fast train, to a local train, to another local train, to a ferry, to arrive at the remote fishing island where you drop off your bags at your guest house, to a bus, to the lineup, to the little entrance where you take off your shoes. The guards loom over you as you approach the puddles that form on the hydrophobic cement at the Teshima Art Museum. It’s forbidden to touch the water, which makes touching the water twice as tempting.

Through the large holes in the ceiling, dead leaves, insects and other debris floated in. Three red strings hang from the ceiling that sway with the breeze. Water seeps out from quarter-inch holes. The underlying concept is the observation of the elements and nature. Throughout Japan, the integration of nature, art and ritual is a recurrent theme that comes from Zen  tradition. The walls surrounding Zen gardens are treated so that the rain creates texture over the years and the groomed stones or sand imitate water for the monks to meditate upon without the hassle of maintaining an actual pond. These themes live on in places like the world’s first digital art museum and you get used to taking off your shoes everywhere, unless your footwear involves a lot of lacing.

In Pond, my resulting project for my field class to Japan, I looped a short clip of swimming koi fish kept at a temple that goes from naturalism to various digital manipulations of glitch, layers and time warps. This loop is then distorted by a layer of thin water the viewer is encouraged to touch that covers a mirror which projects the image to the ceiling. Thus both the image and the viewer get to be in direct contact with the element of water. Lying down on bean bags encourages a state of relaxation for the viewer, though it’s not as effective as taking a trip to a remote fishing island which seems to host as many stray cats as human full-time residents. It’s tempting to expand the installation into a mirror based river surrounded by a miniature landscape of rock, moss and dirt increasing the collapse between the organic and digital. I also think this would have been better in socks, but I think most art experiences would be better in socks.

Dinos Are Not Dead

Narrative | 2 mins | Dec 2018

I couldn’t get myself to kill the pigeon. The building manager said I had to kill the pigeon. She glared at me as I cracked her egg and swept away her nest that had appeared overnight on my balcony. The breakfast I had planned to eat on said balcony was cold, it was now lunchtime, and I didn’t feel like eggs anymore. The couple returned over the next couple weeks, peeking in through the frame of my sliding doors, as though I kept their egg, though she witnessed the abortion. Do they seek revenge?

It sounded like a dinosaur,

I reminded Katherine that a small group of sound designers working for Steven Spielberg decided what dinosaurs sound like. [1]Rachel Funnell, “Exclusive: How Were The Dinosaur Noises in Jurassic Park Made, And Were They Accurate?” I fucking love science, 6 October 2020, … Continue reading

Some say the age of the dinosaurs is over, but all birds are descendants of dinosaurs and they want to get into my apartment. [2]University of California Museum of Paleontology, “Are Birds Really Dinosaurs?” Dinobuzz: current topics considering Dinosaurs, University of California, Berkeley, … Continue reading [3]Lowell Dingus and Timothy Rowe, Chapter 12: The Evolutionary Map for Dinosaurs, The Mistaken Extinction, New York, W. H. Freeman, 2018, … Continue reading With a population of 400 million, pigeons in particular live in most cities worldwide. [4] Emma Bryce, “Why Are There So Many Pigeons?” Live Science, October 27, 2018, https://www.livescience.com/63923-why-cities-have-so-many-pigeons.html, accessed on April 19, 2021. The Surplus Value of Images by W. J. T. Mitchell uses the example of the dinosaur to talk about how our collective images evolve, but why stop at the image? [5]W. J. T. Mitchell, “The Surplus Value of Images”, Mosaic: An Interdisciplinary Critical Journal, September 2002, Vol. 35, No. 3 (September 2002), pp. 1–23, … Continue reading I don’t think Spielberg realized the profound effect he would have on our collective fantasy of Jeff Golblum or the dinosaur. We were told to make something simple, a sketch if you will, in response to “The Surplus Value of Images”. As usual, I prefer visual density that is brief to watch, but not to make.
I mix text, animation, moving and still images that juxtaposed the themes of  sound vs image, dinosaur vs pigeon. My manipulations hide in plain sight to create a visual riddle. The digital mask created from filming the two phobic liquids of oil and balsamic vinegar refers back to the psychedelic era of the 70s through the iconic work of the collective Joshua Light Show, best known for the live moving images during the shows of the likes of Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix. [6]Gregory Zinman “The Joshua Light Show: Concrete Practices and Ephemeral Effects”, American Art, Vol. 22, No. 2 (Summer 2008), pp. 17–21, … Continue reading The shape of the liquid in movement is visible as the viewer is at liberty  to make connections or not according to their personal myths and relationships to the extinct beasts that are not lizards and flying urban residents. [7]Dr. Biology. “If birds evolved from dinosaurs, would that make them reptiles too?” ASU—Ask A Biologist. 12 May 2017. https://askabiologist.asu.edu/questions/birds-dinosaurs-reptiles, … Continue reading

References

References
1 Rachel Funnell, “Exclusive: How Were The Dinosaur Noises in Jurassic Park Made, And Were They Accurate?” I fucking love science, 6 October 2020, https://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/exclusive-how-were-the-dinosaur-noises-in-jurassic-park-made-and-were-they-accurate/, accessed on November 26th.
2 University of California Museum of Paleontology, “Are Birds Really Dinosaurs?” Dinobuzz: current topics considering Dinosaurs, University of California, Berkeley, https://ucmp.berkeley.edu/diapsids/avians.html, accessed on March 9, 2021
3 Lowell Dingus and Timothy Rowe, Chapter 12: The Evolutionary Map for Dinosaurs, The Mistaken Extinction, New York, W. H. Freeman, 2018, http://www.geo.utexas.edu/courses/302d/Mistaken%20Extinction/Chapter%2012.pdf, accessed on March 9, 2021
4 Emma Bryce, “Why Are There So Many Pigeons?” Live Science, October 27, 2018, https://www.livescience.com/63923-why-cities-have-so-many-pigeons.html, accessed on April 19, 2021.
5 W. J. T. Mitchell, “The Surplus Value of Images”, Mosaic: An Interdisciplinary Critical Journal, September 2002, Vol. 35, No. 3 (September 2002), pp. 1–23, http://www.jstor.com/stable/44029949, accessed on December 3, 2020.
6 Gregory Zinman “The Joshua Light Show: Concrete Practices and Ephemeral Effects”, American Art, Vol. 22, No. 2 (Summer 2008), pp. 17–21, https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/591166, accessed on November 26, 2020
7 Dr. Biology. “If birds evolved from dinosaurs, would that make them reptiles too?” ASU—Ask A Biologist. 12 May 2017. https://askabiologist.asu.edu/questions/birds-dinosaurs-reptiles, accessed on May 5, 2021

Profile Picture

Composite Image | Oct 2018

Get a face that reads as calm, professional and welcoming. Don’t look like you need validation. Don’t look like you need money.  I can’t remember why I needed this photo. My bathroom became my studio, again. The mirror helped keep my DSLR on a tripod at arm’s length. This resulted in a collection of almost identical photos of me staring into the lens from different angles.

I had this set of photos and I was bored. We would not be making any videos quite yet for our studio class. I superimposed the photos together in continuation of my tradition of profile pictures that try too hard. I was layering the body and changing scales to build a visual riddle. I played with the head, the face, the eyes and the gaze. As humans we are primed to look for faces. We see them in everyday objects, babies learn to search for the eyes very early in development [1]David Robson, “Neuroscience: why do we see faces in everyday objects?” British Broadcasting Corporation, 29th of July 2014, … Continue reading [2]Max McClure, “Infants process faces long before they recognize other objects, Stanford vision researchers find”, Stanford News, December 11, 2012, … Continue reading

Your brain works unconsciously to respond to the gaze even while your conscious self is looking for Photoshop lines. But you could never stare this image in the eyes, there are too many. It will always look at you more than you at it. What’s supposed to be the head here? 

References

References
1 David Robson, “Neuroscience: why do we see faces in everyday objects?” British Broadcasting Corporation, 29th of July 2014, https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20140730-why-do-we-see-faces-in-objects, accessed on March 19, 2021
2 Max McClure, “Infants process faces long before they recognize other objects, Stanford vision researchers find”, Stanford News, December 11, 2012, https://news.stanford.edu/pr/2012/pr-infants-process-faces-121112.html, accessed on March 19, 2021